Why Socialisation Of Your Dog Is Essential

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Lots of people get home with their new gun dog puppy and start training them for their new life outdoors. 

Training your pup control and obedience is important, but there’s a third topic that is sometimes overlooked… Socialiatation.

What Is Socialisation?

Socialisation is where an owner looks for new learning experiences for their puppy (or older dog if they have not been correctly socialised). It’s about you ensuring that your dog has a chance to build positive memories in lots of different environment’s.  As their memory bank of experiences builds, they learn to feel safe and secure in lots of new environments. A pups socialisation in this window of time determines how they will respond as an adult. 

The Socialisation Window

Teaching a dog to cope well with new experiences should normally be done in the first 12 to 18 weeks of its life. This is known as a pups critical socialisation window. It’s the time that the pup can easily build positive responses to lots of different objects, people and situations. Pups that are not socialised , tend to go on to show undesirable behaviours towards situations that frighten or upset them. During this time its important that the pup builds positive memories that they use to determine their decision making process as they grow. 

Things To Keep In Mind When Socialising Your Pup

Positive experiences are key. Be calm with your pup and allow them to explore and become comfortable in the new situation. If you try to rush your pup it will have the opposite effect and actually cause problems. Be patient, use treats and encourage your puppy to be brave. Make sure you approach the new experience slowly and do not expect your pup to be fine after just one socialisation event. 

Use our FREE SOCIALISATION CHECKLIST to think about the different objects and environments your pup needs socialisation to. Use our FREE DAILY LOG to record what socialisation situations you have been working on. 

The more positive socialisation you do with your pup, the better your dog will respond to daily life. 

Our checklist has been separated into 5 different categories:

  • People
  • Animals
  • Noises
  • Environments
  • Objects

In each category we have added a number of experience opportunities. Also make sure you are frequently handling your pup. We haven’t listed handling experiences as this should be taking place with your daily grooming and health checks. 

Try to make sure your pup frequently gets to experience these socialisation opportunities more than once, the more the better. Encourage your pup to become calm and confident around as many of those experiences on the checklist as possible. 

My older dog was not socialised correctly what should I do?

Dogs that have been undersocialised tend to show socialisation problems. This can be displayed as anxiety, anger, nervousness or any other negative behaviour emotion. 

Depending on your dogs behaviour you may be able to gently encourage your dog into new experiences with lots of praise, treats and distraction until the dog relaxes. 

For most dogs this will take a large number  of socialisation opportunities and may never be corrected. If you are unsure of how to carry out a socialisation process correctly, contact a trainer or dog behaviourist who can provide testimonials of working with nervous dogs. 

Check out our Masterclass on Working With Sensitive Dogs as a starting point. 

 

Question Of The Week?

What’s your experiences of socialisation? 

Leave your reply in the comments below. 

2 Comments

  1. DebsRoberts says:

    My nearly-2yr old WCS was traumatised by my s-in-l’s mastiff at 15 mths old – chased in play but she was terrified. She associates all vehicles with the incident and refuses to go in the back of any car. She will come in the front with me in the gator which is ok cos I’ve trained her to sit under the seats. However if I’m in the pick up she wants to sit in the drivers footwell- not ideal. She also panics and triggers a ptsd attack when she sees or smells my s-in-l. It’s really difficult and I feel so sorry for her. We’re taking very small baby steps but tbh its taking so long I don’t have much confidence she will ever recover.

  2. Most importantly, remember to allow your dog to be a dog, when and where appropriate and under control to the best of your ability. You will have a happier, healthier more contented dog.But, above, all , respect other dog owners, their views and mannerisms.

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2 Comments

  1. DebsRoberts says:

    My nearly-2yr old WCS was traumatised by my s-in-l’s mastiff at 15 mths old – chased in play but she was terrified. She associates all vehicles with the incident and refuses to go in the back of any car. She will come in the front with me in the gator which is ok cos I’ve trained her to sit under the seats. However if I’m in the pick up she wants to sit in the drivers footwell- not ideal. She also panics and triggers a ptsd attack when she sees or smells my s-in-l. It’s really difficult and I feel so sorry for her. We’re taking very small baby steps but tbh its taking so long I don’t have much confidence she will ever recover.

  2. Most importantly, remember to allow your dog to be a dog, when and where appropriate and under control to the best of your ability. You will have a happier, healthier more contented dog.But, above, all , respect other dog owners, their views and mannerisms.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *